Sun Damage

The sun and its ultraviolet (UV) rays can damage more than just skin. Cumulative sun exposure damages the skin and accelerates the aging process. Ultraviolet light from the sun penetrates not only the outer layer of skin, but also the layers below, which fortify it.

We use multiple lasers for sun damage:

Erbium Laser: this laser treats sun damaged skin with minimal downtime. An Erbium Laser Peel is the latest evolution in laser skin renewal technology and allows for spot removal as needed. This treatment provides a safe and highly accurate method of restoring softer, smoother, more youthful appearing skin.
Radiofrequency and IPL: helps decrease the brown spots from the sun and blends the colors of the skin together.
1064 Rejuvenation Laser: will help replace sun damaged skin with new skin.
Photofacial IPL: diffuses the brown spots.
CO2 Fractional Laser: allows all new skin to replace the sun damaged skin.
Q-Switched Laser: treats actinic keratosis.

visiblelight

UVA, which penetrates the skin more deeply than UVB, has long been known to play a major part in skin aging and wrinkling (photoaging), but until recently scientists believed it did not cause significant damage in areas of the epidermis (outermost skin layer) where most skin cancers occur. Studies over the past two decades, however, show that UVA damages skin cells called keratinocytes in the basal layer of the epidermis, where most skin cancers occur. (Basal and squamous cells are types of keratinocytes.) UVA contributes to and may even initiate the development of skin cancers.

uvradiation

UVB, the chief cause of skin reddening and sunburn, tends to damage the skin’s more superficial epidermal layers. It plays a key role in the development of skin cancer and a contributory role in tanning and photoaging. Its intensity varies by season, location, and time of day. The most significant amount of UVB hits the U.S. between 10 AM and 4 PM from April to October. However, UVB rays can burn and damage your skin year-round, especially at high altitudes and on reflective surfaces such as snow or ice, which bounce back up to 80 percent of the rays so that they hit the skin twice. UVB rays do not significantly penetrate glass.

FDA-Approved Sunscreens
Active Ingredient/UV Filter Name Range Covered
UVA1: 340-400 nm
UVA2: 320-340 nm
UVB: 290-320 nm
Chemical Absorbers:
Aminobenzoic acid (PABA) UVB
Avobenzone UVA1
Cinoxate UVB
Dioxybenzone UVB, UVA2
Ecamsule (Mexoryl SX) UVA2
Ensulizole (Phenylbenzimiazole Sulfonic Acid) UVB
Homosalate UVB
Meradimate (Menthyl Anthranilate) UVA2
Octocrylene UVB
Octinoxate (Octyl Methoxycinnamate) UVB
Octisalate ( Octyl Salicylate) UVB
Oxybenzone UVB, UVA2
Padimate O UVB
Sulisobenzone UVB, UVA2
Trolamine Salicylate UVB
Physical Filters:
Titanium Dioxide UVB, UVA2
Zinc Oxide UVB,UVA2, UVA1